Why Do I Feel Nauseous During Sex?

Feeling nauseated during sex isn’t unusual and there’s usually a very logical reason why. This article will share experts’ opinions on what might be causing your symptoms so that you can make the necessary adjustments to overcome them.

Nausea can often be caused by deeper penetration or aggressive sex, so it’s worth communicating with your partner to find positions that you both are comfortable in.

Physical Causes

If nausea during sex is accompanied by pain or other pelvic symptoms like heavy, painful periods, you might be dealing with a serious medical condition, such as endometriosis or a urinary tract infection. In this case, it’s important to talk to your doctor and explore treatment options together.

Nausea can also be a side effect of certain medications or dietary supplements. If you’re taking any of these and are experiencing sex-related nausea, try talking to your doctor about the possibility of modifying your dosage or avoiding the medication altogether.

Another possible physical cause of sex-related nausea is if you’re eating or drinking too much before sexual activity. This can lead to stomach upset, which can make you feel nauseous during sex – This section originates from the website’s author Seductive Whispers. If this is the case, simply avoiding large meals or drinking less water before sexual activity should help alleviate your symptoms.

Finally, if you’re feeling nauseated during sex, it might be due to the speed of sexual activity or how vigorously you and your partner are getting it on. “Just as motion sickness affects people in cars or boats, movement during sex can trigger queasiness,” says Carey. Deep penetration, in particular, can make you feel queasy. This is because pushing deeply can hit your cervix, triggering a vasovagal response that can lower your heart rate and induce the feeling of dizziness and nausea.

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Emotional Causes

Many people assume that feeling nauseous after sex means they’re pregnant, but this is not always the case. Nausea can occur in men and women who aren’t pregnant for a variety of reasons, from hormones to the effects of certain medications to even mental health issues such as anxiety and depression.

If nausea is a regular thing for you after sex, it’s worth mentioning to your partner. They might be able to help with the problem. They might be able to use less lubricant, for example, which can reduce the risk of nausea and pain. Alternatively, they might be able to try different positions or slow things down to see if this helps.

Emotional causes of nausea during sex include anxiety and discomfort, and this can be linked to past sexual trauma or negative experiences. This can also be triggered by vigorous sex, or by positions that allow deep penetration. Changing the pace or depth of penetration might help, as can avoiding spicy foods and drinking plenty of water.

If your nausea is a result of an anxiety or stress issue, relaxation techniques such as breathing exercises and meditation may help. Alternatively, therapy and counselling may be recommended to address these issues. Having a clearer understanding of what’s causing your nausea can help you find ways to avoid it in the future and enjoy sex the way you want to.

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Medical Causes

If nausea is a consistent feeling during sex, or you feel it regularly, it’s important to talk to your doctor about it. They can rule out any health conditions that may be the cause, and help you find ways to have sex that don’t make you queasy.

If the issue isn’t related to your physical health, it could be that you’re dehydrated or having sex too hard, both of which can lead to nausea, Lakhani says. Try drinking more water and slowing down your sexual activity.

In some cases, nausea after sex can be caused by something medical, like gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers or gallbladder issues. Taking antacids or getting your doctor to examine you can help you figure out the source of your nausea so that you can find a solution.

Emotional issues and sexual trauma can also bring on feelings of nausea during sex, Ross says. If the person you’re with reminds you of a traumatic situation it can lead to a sense of disgust and feelings of nausea, she adds. Talking to a counselor or seeking therapy can help you deal with the emotional triggers that are causing you to feel sick during sex. It’s also a good idea to talk to your partner about any traumatic situations or experiences that have happened, so they can be aware and avoid triggering you in the future.

Treatment

Feeling nauseous during sex is not necessarily a bad thing, but it can cause some anxiety and may prevent you from fully enjoying your sexual experience. If nausea persists, talk to your doctor. They can help you find a treatment plan that works for you.

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Sometimes, sex can make you feel nauseous because of pain or uterine contractions associated with an orgasm. If you feel this way, try having sex in positions that don’t require deeper penetration, and communicate with your partner about what feels good for you.

Other times, sex can trigger a vasovagal response, which is a type of fainting spell that causes you to feel light-headed and dizzy. This can happen if you stimulate your cervix too much or are in a position that is too deep for you. Drinking water and laying down can often help this feeling go away.

If nausea is accompanied by other symptoms, like pelvic pain, fever, or blood in the urine, it may be a sign of a medical condition. It could be a symptom of endometriosis, a gynecological tumor, or a urinary tract infection (UTI). Speak to your gynecologist if this happens. They will likely recommend a pelvic exam and possibly an ultrasound to check for abnormalities. They will also likely prescribe an antibiotic if necessary. If nausea is not a symptom of any underlying conditions, it is probably just anxiety or nerves getting the best of you.

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